Audio is the best thing for productivity, Spotify finds

Image Credit: Spotify

Staying focussed can be hard and so Spotify have done a study to find out whether they can be of any help. Surprise, surprise – they can!

Recently Spotify commissioned a study in the UK and US to take a look at how people were affected when it came to being productive and listening to music. In particular the last year has been full of stresses which have made it hard to focus and Spotify’s music and podcast offerings have been a source of solace for many. But can they help us focus?

Spotify revealed that in the last year they’ve seen a 26% increase in “focus” playlists created by listeners themselves around the world. These new playlists have been accompanying us as many adjust to working from home and a very different way of living, being forced to apart from each other more than ever.

So Spotify set out to find out whether they can really help people. Their study found that 37% of respondents feel audio is best thing that they can use to enhance their productivity and drive their focus. Whether it’s relaxing music to help them focus for work or energetic music to get people up and active around the house for chores or work, the right audio accompaniment can be huge for motivation their study found.

But that’s an important thing to note it seems; choosing the right piece of audio makes all the difference. Whilst roughly 80% of people said that listening to something helped them get into a certain mood and focus, nearly 75% of respondents also said that what they’re listening to needs to be tailored to what they’re doing for the best effect.

Here’s what they found worked for people:

  • Study and chill: 69% of respondents said ambient or chill music is better for studying, with 67% indicating ‘slower’ beats are key for their study sessions. The top three most popular playlists within the Spotify Focus Hub across the globe include: Peaceful PianoLo-Fi Beats, and Instrumental Study. “Chicago Freestyle (feat. Giveon)” by Drake and Giveon is the top-streamed chill/ambient track, followed by “Mariposa” by Peach Tree Rascals, “Yellow Hearts” by Ant Saunders, “Into the Unknown” by AURORA & Idina Menzel, and “Call Me Maybe” by Carly Rae Jepsen. 
  • Foster home improvement: 64% of respondents said that when doing housework or making home improvements, they prefer to listen to high-energy music with a faster BPM. Looking for the perfect jams for just that? Check out Spotify’s “Get Chores Done” and “Housewerk” playlists.
  • Fuel creativity: 43% of respondents said they are more likely to listen to instrumental music when writing creatively or analyzing data/information. 
  • Use audio to help you fight the afternoon slump: Spotify found that streams of its Focus Hub are highest in the afternoons, between 12 p.m. and 5 p.m. 
  • Find the right track for you for the moment: Searching for the perfect song or podcast for the moment can be tough—nearly a quarter (24%) of respondents said they struggle to find the right content—but personalized playlists like Spotify’s popular Discover Weekly or Brain Snacks playlists can help you find the right audio, made just for you.
  • Switch off when you need it: Audio isn’t only for laser-focused task completion—it can also help you decompress. In fact, 87% of respondents reported using audio to help switch off and relax. Updated twice daily, the evening edition of Spotify’s Daily Wellness playlist is built to get you ready for a good night’s sleep so you can slip into one of the most crucial acts of wellness and self-care. Or check out Happier with Gretchen Rubin, where Rubin provides practical, manageable advice about happiness and good habits. 
Writing about music, listening to music, and occasionally playing music.

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