Taylor are redefining acoustic guitars with a brand new design

Taylor have been a leading brand in guitars for years now. Their new design for acoustic guitars brings new life to the ageless instrument.

This year, Taylor shook up the acoustic world with the introduction of a new internal-bracing system for its pricier acoustics. Called “V-Class” bracing, it was devised by Andy Powers, a master guitar maker who joined Taylor in 2011 and has been talked about as an heir to Bob Taylor’s leadership.

In his hand’s on review with the new design for Business Insider UK, Matthew DeBord says:

There’s a reason why musicians who play in churches and a lot of electric-centric folks adore Taylors: the amplified characteristics are stunning, replicating the natural sound of an acoustic even at higher volumes.

At this level, acoustics don’t have flaws — they simply have varying degrees of magnificent virtues. But the V-Class bracing lives up to its billing and then some. By nature of their legacy design, acoustic guitars are never really perfect, and almost everybody fights a bit to achieve what they want, no matter how skilled they are.

My time with the 914ce reminded me that if you’re a casual guitarist and deeply amateur musician, you can certainly enjoy a fine instrument. But it also highlighted how much a good guitar can help a great player better express him or herself. In my experience, even some famous guitars, such as the Gibson J-45, don’t much like to be played all over the neck.

Not so with the new Taylors — where the V-Class bracing, combined with the company’s neck-to-body joining for which its already renowned, means that you can hit every single available note and savor the sustain and volume that Powers focused on while remaining deliciously in tune. And even if you don’t like single-note playing and prefer strumming chords, the difference between a three- and four-finger G chord on the 914ce is a revelation.

Read the full review to find out just how Taylor’s new innovations work and exactly how much of an impact they have on your sound.

Head of Social Media and Marketing, RouteNote