Apple’s HomePod Speaker: revolutionary design or a marshmallow toilet roll?

This week Apple unveiled the HomePod speaker, taking on Amazon and Google, but as usual for an Apple product the design jokes are rolling in.

Apple’s newly revealed home speaker, HomePod, will see the tech giant take on Amazon’s massively popular Echo speaker with their Siri-powered alternative. Whilst Apple seem proud of their HomePod the public response is mixed, with many ripping into the speaker in ways reminiscent of Apple’s questionable AirPods.

With its curved, blocky design the comparisons have been rolling in with some joking that it looks like a roll of toilet paper. Others have been slightly more complimentary with their design comparisons saying that it looks like a giant marshmallow, sweeter but still not the revolutionary speaker Apple had hoped it to be viewed as.

One Twitter user even went so far as to compare it to an Amazon Echo wrapped in toilet paper…

Apple may have faced less humorous criticism if they hadn’t continued their legacy of marking their prices far above similar competing products. Apple say that the HomePod will cost $350, more than double what both the Google Home and Amazon Echo cost – the current leaders in the home speaker market.

The HomePod doesn’t add much from competitor speakers except for simple Apple Music connectivity, however their advanced audio quality thanks to enhanced speakers could be the deciding factor for audiophiles after a connected, home speaker.

Until it’s released later this year and we see just how receptive people are of Apple’s new HomePod we can continue to enjoy what Twitter has to say about the divisive product.

Head of Social Media and Marketing, RouteNote

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